MAXIMIZING MILK FAT WITH DE NOVO FATTY ACIDS

Posted by Richard Shepardson, M.S. and Matthew Sellers, Ph.D on Nov 12, 2020 11:09:15 AM

Maximizing milk fat is an important key to profitability on dairy farms. Milk fat is derived from two sources – de novo fatty acids (FA), which are synthesized directly in the mammary gland from short-chain FA, also known as volatile FA, and preformed FA that are transferred to the mammary gland directly from plasma and originate primarily from the diet. Recent research has shown that increasing de novo FA concentrations in milk is correlated with increases in overall milk fat concentration. There are many ways in which a farm can promote high de novo FA concentration in their herd including forage management, providing fresh and well-mixed feed, improving rumen health, and other nutrition and management strategies. Dairies looking to improve or maintain their bulk tank fat test should consider assessing and implementing this on farm.  

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Topics: Animal Nutrition

Alpha-lactalbumin: Enabling Higher Quality Infant Formula

Posted by Research & Development on Nov 6, 2020 11:05:23 AM

Breastfeeding is recommended by the World Health Organization as the best option for the developing infant1. Where breastfeeding is not possible, infant formulas provide a nutritious substitute, with advances in technology enabling more sophisticated formulas to be produced.

Both human and bovine milk are complex matrices of nutrients and bioactive compounds, developed by nature to support growth and development. The protein in both human and bovine milk is composed of two main types: whey and casein, although the ratio of these varies between species; from 60:40 whey:casein in mature human milk, to 20:80 in cows’ milk. Both types of proteins are high quality, meaning they have an excellent essential amino acid profile that is well digested and absorbed by the body.

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Topics: Human Nutrition Ingredients

ON FARM NECROPSY: 3 KEY ELEMENTS OF A MISSED OPPORTUNITY

Posted by Elizabeth Marvel on Oct 12, 2020 7:00:00 AM

Unfortunately, mortality is a reality we must face when raising milk fed calves. Necropsy is a post-mortem evaluation done to assess the cause of death. Many people believe necropsies are only performed to determine cause of death, but there are additional insights we can gain from this procedure. With on farm necropsy, we can gain insight on how well the overall operation is performing.  

 

There are three key elements to focus on when performing a necropsy on milk fed calves that can be used to evaluate potential management opportunities.  

 

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Topics: Calf Management

THE TREND IS CLEAR: FORMULATING WITH CLEAR WHEY PROTEIN

Posted by Jennifer Roberts, R&D Product Development Scientist on Sep 22, 2020 9:13:21 AM

Protein products have dominated store shelves for several years now – everything from protein bars to shakes, chips to baking mixes. Protein, specifically proteins from milk, have been shown to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease1 and improve overall satiety2. They’re also great for muscle recovery, on-the-go nutrition, and create functional benefits for a multitude of food categories. So, what is driving innovation in this market? Clear proteins. These proteins are capable of fortifying new categories of functional foods. They can be utilized at a range of concentrations, processes, and provide a clean and fresh flavor. In this blog, we’ll explore the benefits of clear whey proteins, how to use them, important formulation and processing considerations, and highlight PRObev™, our award-winning protein that is a leader in the clear protein category.

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Topics: Human Nutrition Ingredients

HIGH PURITY FAT SUPPLEMENTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON DIGESTIBILITY

Posted by Richard Shepardson, M.S. and Matthew Sellers, Ph.D on Sep 13, 2020 4:30:00 PM

Commercial fat supplements for dairy cows containing varying ratios of palmitic (PA; C16:0), stearic (SA; C18:0), and oleic acids (OA; C18:1) are common in modern lactating dairy rations. Some commercial supplements contain a blend of multiple fatty acids (e.g. PA + OA, PA + SA), whereas other supplements may be highly enriched in just a single fatty acid (FA). The profile of a supplement largely impacts FA digestibility. Recent research reports that supplemental fats that are highly enriched (>90%) in either PA or SA have very low digestibility compared to supplements that are of moderate (~80-85%) or low enrichment (<60% of a particular FA). When choosing a supplemental fat feeding strategy, FA profile should be taken into account in order to maintain adequate digestibility and thereby maximize return on investment.

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Topics: Animal Nutrition

IS IT OKAY FOR THE GRAIN BUCKET TO BE EMPTY?

Posted by Milk Specialties Technical Experts on Sep 3, 2020 12:45:43 PM

Before we answer if it is okay for the grain bucket to be empty, let us go over the importance of starter intake for pre-weaned calves. Pre-weaned dairy calves need starter grain to initiate rumen development. Bacteria in the rumen begin to utilize nutrients from the starter grain and produce volatile fatty acids that assist with rumen development and feed intakes. To maximize starter grain consumption, it is essential to understand how much calves will eat and what factors might impede consumption of starter grain.

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Topics: Calf Management

HOW WHEY PROTEINS SUPPORT THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

Posted by Research & Development on Aug 21, 2020 8:30:31 AM

The influence that whey proteins can have on the immune system is an area of growing interest and, with more consumers seeking ways to support their immune system, it’s no surprise that the demand for such ingredients are on the rise.

WHEY PROTEIN

Whey protein is renowned for its muscle building ability, given its unrivalled composition and digestibility characteristics. Think about it – whey protein has all nine essential amino acids, is high in leucine, a great source of branched-chain amino acids, and absorbs quickly, not least due to its high digestibility. It supports strong bodies from a strength perspective (of course, in combination with exercise) and can also assist in weight management goals due to its role in increasing satiety. While whey protein supports these goals, it is more than just muscle building and weight management for your body. The immune system support starts with a healthy, balanced diet, with favorable body weight and composition, and an active lifestyle.

Whey protein is made up of protein fractions, as shown in Figure 1, and each fraction can exert different health benefits. In fact, two key fractions in immune system support are:

  • Lactoferrin
  • Immunoglobulins
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Topics: Human Nutrition Ingredients

IMPACT OF MILK PROTEIN SOURCE ON NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY & CALF PERFORMANCE

Posted by Matthew D. Sellers, PhD on Aug 13, 2020 8:30:27 AM

Defining the nutritional and functional differences between skim milk powder and whey protein concentrate and exploring the effects of these milk protein sources on nutrient digestibility and performance in calves.

Calf milk replacer (CMR) is fed to a majority of the dairy calves in the United States in place of whole milk because it is often more economical, provides convenience and consistency, and lowers risk of disease transmission from unpasteurized milk. Many CMRs are made exclusively from dairy ingredients due to the calf’s innate ability to efficiently digest, absorb, and utilize the nutrients that naturally exist in ingredients of dairy origin.

Research into products to replace whole milk began in the mid-20th century and primarily utilized casein, skim milk, and whey as protein sources. As reviewed in Kertz et al. (2017), the prevailing thought of the time was that quality of protein within a milk replacer was directly related to the ability of the milk replacer to form a clot in the abomasum, and that poor-quality CMR would not form clots in the abomasum, resulting in diarrhea and reduced calf performance. Given that CMRs formulated with dried skim milk powder (SMP) readily clot in the abomasum due to the presence of casein and CMRs formulated with whey protein concentrate (WPC) do not clot in the abomasum due to the absence of casein, one might assume that CMR formulated with SMP would result in improved health and digestibility in calves. A review by Logenbach and Heinrichs (1998) dispels this myth and states that factors other than clotting are responsible for observed differences in calf performance.

This paper defines the nutritional and functional differences between SMP and WPC and explores the effects of these milk protein sources on nutrient digestibility and performance in calves.

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Topics: Calf Management

DURABILITY EVALUATION OF A RUMEN-PROTECTED CHOLINE SUPPLEMENT DURING MILL AND FARM HANDLING

Posted by H. Díaz*, M. Sellers, S. McGregor, J. Albrecht, O. Drehmel and J. Linn. on Jul 22, 2020 3:11:39 PM

82795 Hector Diaz poster presentation

THE IMPORTANCE OF CHOLINE TO DAIRY COWS

In mammals, choline is required for synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and acetylcholine – two important phospholipids that are key to numerous functions in the body. While choline may not be considered an essential nutrient in ruminants due to the ability of the cow to synthesize it, research suggests that increased absorbed choline supports cow health, production, and metabolism. Intestinal flow of choline supplies less than 30% of the choline requirement of the cow, meaning the remainder must be synthesized in the cow or supplemented in an absorbable form.

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Topics: Animal Nutrition

USES FOR A BRIX REFRACTOMETER ON THE FARM

Posted by Milk Spectialties Global Calf Technical Team on Jun 26, 2020 2:49:27 PM

A refractometer with a brix scale is a very useful device for monitoring the nutrition and health of dairy calves. It is a durable piece of equipment that will last many years if cared for properly.

WHAT IS A REFRACTOMETER?

A refractometer is a device that can be used to measure the sugar or solids content of various
solutions. There are manual (figure 1) and digital (figure 2) versions, both of which work very well on the farm. The manual type is usually available for less than $100. Refractometers are available with different types of scales to measure specific gravity, total solids, and Brix. Uses for a Brix refractometer are discussed below. Your herd veterinarian can help you select the most appropriate model for your farm.

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Topics: Animal Nutrition, Calf Management