NUTRITION CHALLENGES FOR AGING: THE IMPACT OF PROTEIN ON SATIETY AND ENERGY INTAKE

Posted by Daniel Crabtree, PhD on May 16, 2022 9:35:14 AM

 

Read More

Topics: HUMAN NUTRITION

RETURN COWS TO POSITIVE ENERGY BALANCE SOONER

Posted by Dr. Jim Lofton on May 11, 2022 1:39:08 PM

The critical element in how well cows fare after calving is energy balance. This in turn has several key components, namely length and extent of negative energy balance, dry matter intake (DMI), and body condition status.

Although the return to positive energy balance after calving varies considerably, the main factor in when this occurs is not milk production level, as many believe. In fact, researchers found that the time required to reach positive energy balance is independent of milk yield. Rather, the most important factor is net energy of lactation (NEL) intake, which is the product of DMI x energy density of the diet.

Since it is difficult to increase DMI in early lactation, the component to alter is energy, as long as it does not reduce DMI. When calcium soaps of fatty acids (CSFA) are used to increase energy density, intake is reduced, which results in more time to reach positive energy balance as seen in Figure 1 for first-calf heifers and in Figure 2 for older cows. The differences in intake between the Energy Booster 100 (EB-100) and the CSFA ration are based on NRC 2001,7 which established that a 1% inclusion of CSFA reduced DMI by 2.5%. This difference translates into heifers and cows fed an EB-100 ration achieving positive energy balance 30 days sooner than when fed CSFA.

Figure 1.

Figure 2. 

Loss of body condition and the corresponding rising non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels are further evidence of CSFA’s negative effect on energy balance. The best physiological indicator of energy balance is plasma NEFA levels. The more body condition mobilized, the greater the NEFA level. NEFA levels have been shown to increase as dietary CSFA levels increase,2 to be greater in mid-lactation first-calf heifers averaging 80 pounds daily milk production when fed CSFA vs. EB-100,6 and to be greater in mid-lactation older cows averaging 93 pounds daily milk production when fed CSFA vs. EB-100.4

So how does lower NEL intake due to decreased DMI affect productivity? Using NRC 2001 NEL values to calculate the effect of energy intake loss on milk yield, inclusion of CSFA trans- lates to reduced milk yield of 5 to 8.5 lb per day, which totals 1,100 lb over the first 140 DIM. If the reduced energy intake is instead converted into body weight loss, the range of daily loss ranges from about 0.75 to 1.33 lb, or a total of 176 lb over the first 140 DIM. In reality, some combination of both milk and body weight loss likely will occur. This energy deficit also negatively impacts reproduction because energy balance during the first 3 to 4 weeks postpartum is correlated with interval to first postpartum ovulation.

Read More

Topics: ANIMAL NUTRITION

THE IMPORTANCE OF NET ENERGY INTAKE AND REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE

Posted by Dr. Jim Lofton on Apr 26, 2022 10:57:44 AM

 

Read More

Topics: ANIMAL NUTRITION

TELLING THE MONROE SUSTAINABILITY STORY

Posted by Erin Huls on Apr 3, 2022 5:40:38 PM

 

Our Approach:

Read More

Topics: SUSTAINABILITY

HOW DO YOU VALUE YOUR BYPASS FAT?

Posted by Dr. Jim Lofton on Mar 15, 2022 12:17:19 PM

 

Read More

Topics: ANIMAL NUTRITION

CAN LACTOSE BE A GOOD FUEL SOURCE FOR ATHLETES?

Posted by Lindsey Ormond, Director of Research & Development on Feb 9, 2022 4:27:56 PM

Our bodies utilize carbohydrates both from the diet (exogenous), and our body stores to provide energy for exercise, particularly prolonged endurance exercise. Carbohydrate is stored in our liver and muscles in the form of glycogen, but there is a limit to how much can be stored. When endogenous stores are depleted, fatigue kicks in and athletes can “hit the wall” if exogenous sources aren’t available. Delaying the depletion of the body’s carbohydrate stores by consuming carbohydrate during exercise is a beneficial tactic for prolonging and enhancing exercise performance. Increasing the use of fat as a fuel (fat oxidation) may also be beneficial for improving exercise performance and delaying depletion of the body’s carbohydrate stores.

Read More

Topics: HUMAN NUTRITION

EVALUATING BYPASS FAT PRODUCTS IN THE ERA OF HIGH FEED COSTS

Posted by Richard Shepardson, M.S. on Feb 2, 2022 3:43:18 PM

 

Read More

Topics: ANIMAL NUTRITION

WHEY CAN INCREASE PROTEIN LEVELS WITHOUT NEGATIVELY IMPACTING OVERALL DIETARY INTAKE IN OLDER ADULTS

Posted by Lindsey Ormond, Director of Research & Development on Dec 23, 2021 9:39:07 AM

Sarcopenia – the loss of muscle mass and strength that occurs naturally with aging – can be mitigated by ensuring sufficient protein intake. Reducing the rate of muscle loss is a key factor for maintaining a free and active lifestyle in the advancing years. However, since protein is the most satiating nutrient and appetite diminishes with age, it could be supposed that adding more protein to the diet could lead to an overall reduction in calorie and nutrient intake at a time when they are critical.

Read More

Topics: HUMAN NUTRITION

FEEDING RUMEN-BYPASS METHIONINE IN TRANSITION AND EARLY LACTATION COWS

Posted by Richard Shepardson, M.S. on Dec 8, 2021 12:25:17 PM

 

Read More

Topics: ANIMAL NUTRITION

Bypass Fats and Dairy Cow Reproduction

Posted by Dr. Jim Lofton on Nov 3, 2021 2:20:06 PM

What should you expect from your bypass fat supplement?

Read More

Topics: ANIMAL NUTRITION